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ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

any number of additional interventions utilized at the same time as a main intervention to supercharge treatment efficacy. For instance, drugs might be utilized at the same time as CBT (cognitive behavior therapy), with the CBT being the main type of intervention- psychotherapy as part of a group might be utilized in addition to psychodynamic therapy on a personal level, having every intervention present it's individual views and techniques to press upon the patient's cognitive consciousness and renewal. Adjunctive treatment is usually executed by a doctor who is not the physician being used to execute the main intervention.

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AFFECTIVITY

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

the level of someone's reaction or vulnerability to sentimental stimulants. Assessment is a highly imperative part of psychological evaluation- the counselor or physician might seek proof of these responses as blunted, inappropriate, or loss altogether of affect.

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ALBRIGHT'S DISEASE

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

launched by Fuller Albright, an American physician, a disease brought about for problems to do with the pituitary gland and hypothalamus gland, marked by color irregularities, bony pseudocysts, and early pubescence in girls.

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AMBULATORY CARE

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

healthcare or mental help offered to people on an outpatient, non-emergency basis. This kind of help might consist of inspection, identification, medication, and rehab treatment and is frequently offered at locations like physician's clinics, medical centers, or certain divisions of hospitals.

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ANDRADE'S SYNDROME

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a name for a group of amyloidic conditions characterized by sensory problems, early menopause, impotence, and overall flaccid paralysis. Other names include Corino de Andrade's paramyloidosis, polyneuritic amyloidosis, and Yvohlwill-Corino Andrade Syndrome. [Corino de Andrade, Portuguese physician- Joachim Friedrich Wohlwill (1881-19581, Ger man physician]

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ANIMAL MAGNETISM

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a hypothesized and mystical force that attracts males and females to each other, for the purposes of mating. This term is often used in popular comedy, but was actually proposed by an Austrian physician known as Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815).

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ANIMAL SPIRITS

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

Roman physician Galen (129-215) suggested that these numerous animal spirits flowed through hollow tubes from the brain to all parts of the body - what is now known as the nerve impulse. French philosopher and mechanistic physiologist Rene Descartes (1596-1650) later discredited this concept somewhat when he discovered the modern concept now known as the peripheral nervous system, and emphasized nerve conduction in both directions, between sensory centers and muscles. Animal spirits are also known as vital spirits. See also hydraulic model.

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ANOMIA

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

n. 1. An impaired ability to remember and verbalize the names of objects. See also color anomia- amnesic aphasia. 2. Defective moral sensibilities |defined by U.S. physician Benjamin Rush (1745-1813)

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APHANISIS

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

n. a now obsolete term that once indicated the total extinction of sexual desire. |defined by British physician Ernest Jones (1879-1958)]

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APHEMIA

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

n. Originally defined by French physician Pierre Paul Broca (1824-1880), this refers to a motor aphasia with nonfluency (i.e., lack of speech) but intact language functioning - as evidenced by intact writing abilities. This condition was later renamed Broca

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