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ACTION SLIP

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

any sort of mistake which involves some sort of intellectual backslide and causes an accidental action, such as placing your eyeglasses in the freezer. Action mistakes are largely called absent-minded blunders. Reference: Absent-mindedness

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ACTION-ORIENTED THERAPY

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

any sort of treatment which stresses starting and, of course, completing behaviors instead of spoken correspondence or perhaps conversation,

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ACTIVATIONAL EFFECT

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a temporary chemical influence which usually produces a brief variation in performance or physical motion in mature animals. For instance, escalated testosterone in male songbirds during the growing season causes escalated violence in terrain protection and an increase in the bird's wooing performance.

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ACTIVE LISTENING

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a psychotherapeutic approach that occurs when the professional listens to a patient meticulously and diligently, inquiring as required, in an effort to completely comprehend the matter related with the message and the level of the patient's feelings. The professional usually repeats whatever the patient has stated to guarantee the patient that they have been comprehended. Active listening is used commonly in conjunction with client-centered therapy practices.

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ACTIVE RECREATION

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a type of leisure treatment where a person actively takes part in an operation, like running, which demands actual physical and cognitive effort.

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ADAPTABILITY

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

noun. 1. the ability to render adequate feedback up to modified or developing conditions. 2. the potential to adjust or change an individual's behavior by getting to know diverse circumstances or unique individuals.

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ADAPTATION

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

1. modification of a sense organ to the force or even standard of stimulation, leading to a development where sensorial or perceptual encounters, such as the pupil of the eye ball adapting to dimmed or brightened light. Reference: sensory adaptation. 2. the decreased impact of a stimulant or position as an outcome of extended or replicated exposure to it. 3. with regard to evolution, the alteration of a living body in construction, work, or performance that enhances its ableness to re-create effectively and it's offspring's ableness to thrive and re-create effectively in a developing or unique surrounding or climate. 4. Reference: social adaptation. 5. in Jean piaget's doctrine of cognitive development, the activity of modifying one

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ADAPTIVE SKILLS

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

events that necessitate self-management, such as managing urges, having the ability to get used to a unique surrounding, and also a motivation to educate yourself on developing materials.

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ADDICTION

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

a place of being physically or psychologically dependent upon substances such as drugs and alcohol. Commonly referred to as substance abuse. Diagnostic criteria consists of tolerance, withdrawal, losing control, and uncontrollable use of the drugs or alcohol.

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ADHERENCE

Written by Pam MS, NCSP | Fact checked by Psychology Dictionary staff 

noun. 1. the ableness of a person to comply with a therapeutic program, specifically those comprising drug therapy, guided by a medical professional. Exterior factors impacting such therapeutic interventions might be inclusive of having the right instruction concerning a drug and what is does, the person's capacity to compensate those offering treatment, or otherwise attain the prescribed therapy, and familial or societal belief systems impacting the acceptableness of the therapy sought by the patient. Internal indicators consist of the person's opinions on the effectiveness of the therapy, the existence or inexistence of upsetting side effects, and the a person's capacity to fully grasp or abide by any and all guidelines provided to them by medical professionals. Commonly referred to as compliance.

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