How to Improve Your Child's Reading Comprehension

Education continues to be a critical way in which we prepare our children to become happy, healthy, fruitful adults. One of the fundamental ways in which we do this is in inspiring reading. There has been a number of studies that have highlighted the importance of hearing a high number of words as a child, and its connection to learning aptitude. One of the best ways to do this is with reading. Here are some tips on how to use reading to help your child improve all of their learning skills:

Read. A lot.
One of the simplest ways to help your child become a better reader is to read. Read books with your child every day. It doesn't matter what you read, so much as it does that you do read. Make it a daily bonding activity, and your child will learn to love reading. This kind of bonding will give children a warm sense of comfort when they read, and they will likely want to read on their own as well.

Discuss What You Read
Reading is one thing, but discussion is the other half of comprehension. Have conversations about what happens in books. When your child moves up to chapter books, ask them what they think will happen in future chapters. Ask kids lots of questions about what you read to get them thinking about it. Things like who their favorite character is and why, what do they wish would have happened instead, and why did something good or bad happen to a certain character? The more you do this with your kids, the more that they will learn to do this on their own. You don't have to do this with print books alone, you can also use the same strategy with books on tape. This is especially effective when you are on a long car trip, and promotes family togetherness instead of isolation as a bonus.

Read as a Family
Don't just read to your kids, let them read to you as well. Give them the opportunity to make character voices, let them choose the stories sometimes, and share your favorites with them as well. The more fun that you can make reading together, the more often they will do it. The more often they read and discuss what they read, the better their reading comprehension will become. The best part is that it will feel effortless, not like work at all. Instead, it will be a lot of fun and quality time with your kids, and an easy way to use together time to help your children achieve significant success in school and life. Best of all, successful kids are joyful kids, and you will get to reap the benefits of confident smiles.

Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "How to Improve Your Child's Reading Comprehension," in PsychologyDictionary.org, January 25, 2016, https://psychologydictionary.org/article/how-to-improve-your-childs-reading-comprehension/ (accessed March 20, 2019).
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