ACTIVE THERAPY

1. Hungarian psychoanalyst Sandor Ferenczi's type of therapy where a professional plays a working, instruction part. An active professional might voice viewpoints, provide their own suggested version, render instructions, issue commands and forbiddances, or perhaps encourage the patient to engage in a specific behavior, like confronting an anxiety-invoking condition head-on. 2. with regards to psychoanalysis, a technique used in treatment where the expert withdraws from usual Freudian tradition by (i) inspiring the client to go against the law of abstinence and (ii) neglecting the command regarding not providing guidance regarding the client's choices.

ACTIVE THERAPY: "Active therapy is a preferred method of therapy by many over the more traditional role of a therapist who sits quietly, nodding, guiding the patient to the intended realization."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ACTIVE THERAPY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/active-therapy/ (accessed June 24, 2019).
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