ADAPTATION

1. modification of a sense organ to the force or even standard of stimulation, leading to a development where sensorial or perceptual encounters, such as the pupil of the eye ball adapting to dimmed or brightened light. Reference: sensory adaptation. 2. the decreased impact of a stimulant or position as an outcome of extended or replicated exposure to it. 3. with regard to evolution, the alteration of a living body in construction, work, or performance that enhances its ableness to re-create effectively and it's offspring's ableness to thrive and re-create effectively in a developing or unique surrounding or climate. 4. Reference: social adaptation. 5. in Jean piaget's doctrine of cognitive development, the activity of modifying one

ADAPTATION: "Adaptation to one's new climate or surroundings is sometimes accompanied by physiological changes and cognitive ones as well, such as a racing heartbeat, or anxiety."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ADAPTATION," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/adaptation/ (accessed October 14, 2019).
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