AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE MODEL PENAL CODE IN

a lawful criterion for constructing unlawful culpability, implemented in 1962, that blends aspects of the McNaughten rule and the irresistible impulse rule. Based on this criterion, people aren't accountable for unlawful behavior if during that time when the behavior occurred, as an outcome of cognitive disease or deficiency, they were missing significant capability either to acknowledge the unlawfulness of their behavior or to abide by their behavior to the specifications of the statutes. Commonly referred to as American Law Institute Guidelines.

AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE MODEL PENAL CODE IN: "The American Law Institute's Penal Code Insanity Test complies with standards set years ago to determine the competency of an accused person at the time of the alleged crime."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE MODEL PENAL CODE IN," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/american-law-institute-model-penal-code-insanity-test/ (accessed August 4, 2020).
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