ANGELL, JAMES ROWLAND

(1869-1949). American psychologist often credited with the founding of FUNCTIONALISM, a brand of psychology that focuses on the function (as opposed to the structure) of the brain. His approach argued that the content of consciousness was unimportant - rather the functional evolution of the brain must be studied. Functionalism preceded behaviorism as a major school of thought. Studied under William James at Harvard University early in his career, before becoming chair of the National Research Council and president of Yale University. Awards and honors include elections to the National Academy of Sciences (1920) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1932).

ANGELL, JAMES ROWLAND: "James Rowlad Angell was a leading American psychologist who argued that the function of the brain should be the focus of study rather than the structure or content. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ANGELL, JAMES ROWLAND," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/angell-james-rowland/ (accessed June 20, 2019).
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