ANTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY SYNDROME (ACOA SYNDROME)

a syndrome arising as a consequence of rupture or aneurysm in the anterior communicating artery. This artery is small, located within the brain, and links right and left cerebral arteries. This syndrome causes attentional deficits and severe confusional states - as well as a severe lack of insight. Following the confusion, anterograde or retrograde amnesia may be apparent. See also frontal-lobe syndrome, corticospinal tract.

ANTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY SYNDROME (ACOA SYNDROME): "Anterior communicating artery syndrome begins with a rupture to a communicating artery, and may cause permanent brain damage- resulting in amnesia. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ANTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY SYNDROME (ACOA SYNDROME)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/anterior-communicating-artery-syndrome-acoa-syndrome/ (accessed June 18, 2019).
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