ANTICONVULSANTS

pi. n. drugs used to reduce the frequency or severity of epileptic seizures or fits. Can be used to terminate a seizure already underway. Until the advent of the hydantoins in the 1930s, these medications consisted mainly of bromides and barbiturates. Phenobarbital was first used in the treatment of epilepsy in 1912 and was the main treatment prior to the introduction of the hydantoins phenyioin much later. Current drugs used to treat partial or tonic-clonic seizures include phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid, Phenobarbital, and newer anticonvulsants, such as , gabapentin, tiagabine, tolmeramate, vigabatrin, and zonisamide. Some benzodiazepines are also effective antiseizure medication, but may become addictive. Also known as antiepileptics.

ANTICONVULSANTS: "The person was taking anticonvulsants to help reduce the severity of his or her seizures. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ANTICONVULSANTS," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/anticonvulsants/ (accessed February 21, 2020).
SHARE