BARTLETT TECHNIQUE

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n. a study of memory which is founded on the theory that memory goes beyond being simply reproductive. Rather, it is constructive and reconstructive. Based on the original 1932 study and successive reproductions thereof, a student's own cultural background significantly affects his or her recall of a tale, thus, allowing him or her to restructure elements of the story into one that's more coherent and familiar. Also known as Bartlett tradition. See constructive memory- also reconstructive memory.

BARTLETT TECHNIQUE: "The Bartlett Technique was first tested in a group of British college students who were asked to recall the details of a given Native-American folk tale."
Cite this page: N., Sam M.S., "BARTLETT TECHNIQUE," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/bartlett-technique/ (accessed June 25, 2022).

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