BASIC CONFLICT

n. in the study of ego, the conflict which arises between a person's dominant tendency towards a neurotic trend and a less- to non-dominant neurotic need. Since these two are incompatible, the need is repressed. First defined by German-born, U.S.-based psychoanalyst Karen Horney (1885-1952).

BASIC CONFLICT: "When basic conflict occurs in a person, the response can be in a variety of ways which involve approach and/or avoidance."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BASIC CONFLICT," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/basic-conflict/ (accessed October 14, 2019).
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