BEHAVIORAL GROUP THERAPY

n. a form of psychotherapy which addresses the needs of a specific group of people. Learning-based, it applies cognitive behavioral principles and techniques to modify behavior. These techniques include rehearsal, modeling, systematic desensitization, and social reinforcement. See cognitive behavioral therapy.

BEHAVIORAL GROUP THERAPY: "As an exercise in catharsis, behavioral group therapy works among people with problems in common, such as alcoholism for instance."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "BEHAVIORAL GROUP THERAPY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/behavioral-group-therapy/ (accessed October 22, 2017).
SHARE