BENEFECTANCE

n. a phenomenon of personality which combines benevolence and effectiveness. A self-deceiving act, people selectively remember their previous actions as having been more generous and helpful than they actually were. It makes possible the act of recalling the past as a morally-good and successful one. First proposed by U.S. social psychologist Anthony Greenwald (1939- ). See positive illusion.

BENEFECTANCE: "For most people, benefectance has become a routine way of justifying their past as a more well-intentioned one."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BENEFECTANCE," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/benefectance/ (accessed June 20, 2020).
SHARE