BOND-SAMPLING THEORY OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE

n. a theory on intelligence which postulates that, rather than human intelligence being based on one single factor, it should be sampled from various elements (multiple bonds). Thus, in addition to general ability, a participant should also be evaluated on the ability to follow directions, answer questions, and infer relationships. Proposed by British psychologist Sir Godfrey Thomson (1881-1955).

BOND-SAMPLING THEORY OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE: "The Bond-Sampling Theory of Human Intelligence clarifies the main purpose of having sub-tests in a test, and that is to capitalize on the multiple bonds or elements which contribute to the factor of intelligence."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BOND-SAMPLING THEORY OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/bond-sampling-theory-of-human-intelligence/ (accessed October 12, 2019).
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