CARTESIAN SELF

n. a fundamental certainty that a human can know everything of the self but not of the other. There is a great divide in human consciousness between the knowing subject (ego) and that of another. The conclusion, therefore, would be: Cogito ergo sum. (I think, therefore, I am.)

CARTESIAN SELF: "In the Cartesian self, Descartes proposes a radical dualism in life where there is the subjective, inner mind on one hand and the objective, outer world on the other."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "CARTESIAN SELF," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/cartesian-self/ (accessed July 13, 2020).
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