CATASTROPHIC BEHAVIOR

n. a drastic but impending change in behavior as can only be brought about by shock and catastrophic stress. These are overwhelming reactions to trauma wrought by life-changing events like torture, rape, genocide, or other violent, war-time experiences. First described by German-American psychologist Kurt Goldstein (1878-1965).

CATASTROPHIC BEHAVIOR: "Catastrophic behavior is characterized as extremely-disorganized, to the point of feeling lost and unable to cope."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "CATASTROPHIC BEHAVIOR," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/catastrophic-behavior/ (accessed November 10, 2019).
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