CONTEXTUALISM

noun. 1. the theory that the memory of events isn't just the result of ties between said occurrences, as in the associationist philosophy, but is also a result of the interpretation rendered to events by the framework it lies in regarding other experiences. 2. a viewpoint ascertaining that the climate wherein something happens fundamentally notifies the occurrence and its understanding to perceive an occurrence within a pre-existing cognitive system.

CONTEXTUALISM: "With regard to contextualism, Carrie spent the evening at her friend's wedding recalling the last time she had heard the song played for the couple's first dance also being at a wedding."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "CONTEXTUALISM," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/contextualism/ (accessed July 6, 2020).
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