MOTION ECONOMY

is asset of principles for the efficient performance of industrial processes which were initially proposed by U.S. engineer and psychologist Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878 - 1972) and her husband, U.S. engineer Prank Gilbreth (1868 - 1924). The principles suggest- simultaneous use of both hands moving in opposite directions- use of continuous, curved movements rather than straight line motions- use of the fewest movements possible- use of such items as jigs and fix

MOTION ECONOMY: "The idea of a motion economy involves: simultaneous use of both hands moving in opposite directions- use of continuous, curved movements rather than straight line motions- use of the fewest movements possible- use of such items as jigs and fix"
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "MOTION ECONOMY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/motion-economy/ (accessed March 25, 2020).
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