NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY DISORDER

first proposed by U.S. psychiatrists Wilhelm Reich (1897 - 1957), Otto Kernberg, and Heinz Kohut (1913 - 1981), and U.S. psychologist Theodore Millon (1929 - ), a narcissistic personality disorder is defined in the DSM (diagnostic statistical manual) as: a personality disorder with the following characteristics: (al a long-standing pattern of grandiose self-importance and exaggerated sense of talent and achievements- (b) fantasies of unlimited sex, power, brilliance, or beauty- an exhibitionistic need for attention and admiration- either cool indifference or feelings of rage, humiliation, or emptiness as a response to criticism, indifference, or defeat- and (e) various interpersonal disturbances, such as feeling entitled to special favours, taking advantage of others, and inability to empathize with the feelings of others.

NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY DISORDER: "A narcissistic personality disorder can involve a long-standing pattern of grandiose self-importance and exaggerated sense of talent and achievements- fantasies of unlimited sex, power, brilliance, or beauty- an exhibitionistic need for attention and admiration- either cool indifference or feelings of rage, humiliation, or emptiness as a response to criticism, indifference, or defeat- and various interpersonal disturbances, such as feeling entitled to special favours, taking advantage of others, and inability to empathize with the feelings of others."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY DISORDER," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/narcissistic-personality-disorder/ (accessed October 18, 2019).
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