NEED FOR ACHIEVEMENT (N-ACH)

first proposed by Henry Alexander Murray (1893 - 1988) but wasn't truly investigated until David McClelland took up research looking at the Need for Achievement. Defined plainly, the need for achievement is a strong desire to complete a set goal, or aim and to further attain a high standard of performance and personal fulfilment from that performance when completing the goal. The exaggerated need for affection and approval (in this context) is one of the ten neurotic trends which were identified by German-born U.S. psychoanalyst Karen D. Homey (1885 - 1952).

NEED FOR ACHIEVEMENT (N-ACH): "Many perfectionists and individuals classed as successful will have a degree of a need of achievement, which is an internal drive to achieve whatever tasks are set internally or set by their workplace for example."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "NEED FOR ACHIEVEMENT (N-ACH)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/need-for-achievement-n-ach/ (accessed October 13, 2019).
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