NEUROLINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (NLP)

was first developed in 1976 by U.S. mathematician and therapist Richard Bandler (1950 - ) and U.S. linguist John Grinder (1940 - ). The neurolinguistic programming is a collection of strategies which were devised to improve the interpersonal relationships and levels of communication between individuals by evaluating and modifying currently mental models of the world which individuals develop and use to respond to and interact with the environment and other people. The NLP is based on the principles of neurolinguistics and assumes that the behaviours and language are a result of interaction within the brain.

NEUROLINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (NLP): "Neurolinguistic programming is a collection of standards which were designed to improve relationships between mental models and the general public. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "NEUROLINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (NLP)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/neurolinguistic-programming-nlp/ (accessed August 8, 2020).
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