PHAGOCYTOSIS

3

noun. the procedure by which solid particles, inclusive of foreign compounds, food pieces, and other cells, are engulfed by cells referred to as phagocytes. The compounds are encompassed by membrane, forming a vacuole in the phagocyte which fuses with a lysosome, an organelle made up of enzymes which digest the engulfed materials. Specific white blood cells function as phagocytes as part of the immune reaction.

PHAGOCYTOSIS: "Phagocytosis can take anywhere from moments to hours or days to initiate following the introduction of a harmful substance into the body."
Cite this page: N., Sam M.S., "PHAGOCYTOSIS," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/phagocytosis/ (accessed June 27, 2022).

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