PHANTOM LIMB

the sensations that an amputated body part is still connected to one's body, frequently cultivated as a tingling or, sometimes, painful sensation in the region of the absent part or limb. In some instances, the individual might even refuse to acknowledge or believe the limb has been amputated. It is thought that the nervous system's representation of the limb stays in tact and, in the absence of normal somesthetic arousal, comes to be active spontaneously or as a result of arousal from other neural tissues.

PHANTOM LIMB: "Jessica's sensation that her amputated leg is still present is known as a phantom limb, and is common of amputees."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "PHANTOM LIMB," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/phantom-limb/ (accessed August 4, 2020).
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