PHONETIC SYMBOLISM

the hypothesis postulating that there is a communication of some form between the sounds of words and their afferents, as contrast to an arbitrary union. Most schools of contemporary language are based upon the premise that words are basically arbitrary representations, the only exclusions being a minute amount of onomatopoeic coinages. However, it is an observable fact that the majority of languages consist of clusters of words wherein a likeness of sound appears to imply a likeness of reference. Commonly referred to as sound symbolism.

PHONETIC SYMBOLISM: "Phonetic symbolism can be found throughout the English language."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "PHONETIC SYMBOLISM," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/phonetic-symbolism/ (accessed November 15, 2019).
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