PIAGETIAN THEORY OF INTELLIGENCE

the theory of cognitive development posited by Jean Piaget, in accordance with intelligence that cultivates during four major phases: (i) the sensorimotor, spanning from birth to around two years of age, (ii) the preoperational, from two years to seven years old, (iii) the concrete operational, spanning from seven years old to twelve, and (iv) the formal operational which begins at twelve years of age and continues on indefinitely. In accordance with this theory, each phase develops further upon the one before it. The arrangement is thus fixed as are the general ages at which different phases are attained- Piaget did not believe it was possible to hurry kids via the unfolding of these phases.

PIAGETIAN THEORY OF INTELLIGENCE: "Please open you books to Chapter 16 where we will read about the Piagetian theory of intelligence."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "PIAGETIAN THEORY OF INTELLIGENCE," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/piagetian-theory-of-intelligence/ (accessed September 29, 2019).
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