SCAFFOLDING

Epistemological method of embodied cognition , wherein the environment that an agent functions within is observed as a sine qua non of its own cleverness. A basic illustration is the usage of paper and pencil to carry out complicated arithmetic processes. In education and learning, a instruction model that encourages and enables the pupil as they understand a new ability or theory, with the final objective of the pupil growing to be self-reliant. Based on Lev Vygotsky's hypotheses, in practice it calls for tutoring components barely beyond the stage in which the pupil could comprehend by themselves. Technologies (e .g ., software applications) which may be utilized to aid in this method are referred to as scaffolded tools .

SCAFFOLDING: "The teacher provided scaffolding for the students."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "SCAFFOLDING," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 28, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/scaffolding/ (accessed November 17, 2017).
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