SEDATIVE-, HYPNOTIC-, OR ANXIOLYTIC-INDUCED PERSISTING AMNESTIC DISORDER

Disruption in memory as a result of the prolonged impacts of sedative, hypnotic, or anxiolytic drugs. Capacity to be taught new facts or to recollect formerly understood facts is damaged seriously enough to conflict significantly with interpersonal or job-related function as well as to characterize a substantial decrease from a earlier degree of function. In contrast to those identified as having alcohol-induced persisting amnesia disorder, individuals identified as having this condition can restore memory function.

SEDATIVE-, HYPNOTIC-, OR ANXIOLYTIC-INDUCED PERSISTING AMNESTIC DISORDER: "Sedative-, hypnotic-, or anxiolytic-induced persisting amnesiac disorder allows for the reclamation of memory function."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "SEDATIVE-, HYPNOTIC-, OR ANXIOLYTIC-INDUCED PERSISTING AMNESTIC DISORDER," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 28, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/sedative-hypnotic-or-anxiolytic-induced-persisting-amnestic-disorder/ (accessed September 25, 2018).
SHARE