TELEGRAPHIC SPEECH

1. concentrated or abbreviated speech wherein only the most central terms, postulating the greeted level of data, are stated. Nouns and verbs are commonly present, while adverbs, adjectives, connective parts of speech, and articles are left out. 2. the speech of kids roughly between the ages of eighteen and thirty months, that is generally in the shape of two-word expressions. This speech is telegraphic because it utilizes just the most germane and significant aspects of language, passing over prepositions, articles, and other ancillary terms 3. the speech of kids about twenty-four to thirty months of age which forms after the two-word statement and is marked by brief but multi-word expressions.

TELEGRAPHIC SPEECH: "Telegraphic speech is often referenced as telegraphic stage."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "TELEGRAPHIC SPEECH," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/telegraphic-speech/ (accessed October 15, 2019).
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