TRANSIENT GLOBAL AMNESIA (TGA)

an abrupt global amnesia, a type of temporary amnestic disorder, which commonly resolves within a day and takes place in the absence of any other neurological irregularities. People with TGA seem confused and disoriented and ask often ask the same questions time and again to attempt to make sense of their experience. They are not capable of acquiring new memories; they additionally show retrograde amnesia for recently experienced occurrences. As the episode of TGA passes, new learning slowly returns to normal and retrograde amnesia lessens; people are left with a dense memory gap for the time of TGA.

TRANSIENT GLOBAL AMNESIA (TGA): " TGA might be invoked by precipitating occurrences, like physical stress or exertion."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "TRANSIENT GLOBAL AMNESIA (TGA)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/transient-global-amnesia-tga/ (accessed October 18, 2019).
SHARE