TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR THERAPY

a process in psychotherapy wherein a patient is overseen 24 hours a day by the therapy professional, who has legal, financial, and medical management privileges over the patient, or via the therapy professional's assistants, who preserve management over the patient under the instruction of the therapy professional, at times, mobile telephones or other correspondence tools are utilized by the assistants to receive and attain instruction and data from the therapy professional. Frequently a parent or partner of the patient encourages this procedure whenever the scenario is so desperate that no other technique seems like a possibility.

TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR THERAPY: "The concept of twenty-four hour therapy was cultivated by Eugene F. Landy, an American psychologist."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR THERAPY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/twenty-four-hour-therapy/ (accessed November 17, 2017).
SHARE