ADDITIVE BILINGUALISM

the sociolinguistic circumstance that occurs when another dialect is implemented by a speaking region while not having intimidated the presence or status of the origin language. For instance, the majority of English-speaking residents of Canada choose to educate themselves on the French language because many employment opportunities in their region demand that person's qualified for positions speak both languages. Still, these persons go on utilizing English as their primary language.

ADDITIVE BILINGUALISM: "Many people living or working in large cities where Latin populations are present, such as Miami, Florida, will adopt additive bilingualism and being speaking Spanish in addition to their native English in order to communicate with others better, especially in occupational roles."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "ADDITIVE BILINGUALISM," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/additive-bilingualism/ (accessed June 23, 2017).
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