BASIC ANXIETY

n. in the study of ego, a feeling of being deeply insecure, helpless, and isolated. There is fear of being abandoned to the dangers of a hostile world. German-born, U.S.-based psychoanalyst Karen Horney (1885-1952) describes this infantile dependence and helplessness as a product of poor parenting and parental indifference. Thus, defense mechanisms may arise such as neurotic needs and tendencies. See basic hostility.

BASIC ANXIETY: "In general, a person who suffers from basic anxiety can either be too submissive or too controlling to the point of being much too needy."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BASIC ANXIETY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/basic-anxiety/ (accessed October 14, 2019).
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