AFFECTIVE AGGRESSION

in which they are sentimental responses to a disliked condition or way of being, which are likely to be centered on the assumed provider of the hardship however might be disturbed and placed upon others or items if the distressing stimulant isn't readily available to be assaulted. With regard to Freud's traditional psychoanalytic doctrine, the aggressive impulse is inborn and instinctive, however the significant large portion of nonpsychoanalytically driven specialists see it as a publicly discovered response to stress.

AFFECTIVE AGGRESSION: "Affective aggression is commonly observed in abusive households wherein a child may aggravate an abuser and the abuser might displace their anger onto another household member."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "AFFECTIVE AGGRESSION," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/affective-aggression/ (accessed September 23, 2020).
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