ALLPORT'S PERSONALITY TRAIT THEORY

Gordon W. Allport's doctrine said a person's character traits are the vital points to the individuality and persistence of their behavior. Characteristics are thought of as compelling factors that communicate with one another and the social climate so as to confirm the distinctive behaviors or responses which classify the self. They progress mostly from encounters, education, and simulation and end up in 3 primary classes: (i) primary characteristics or perfected attributes- (ii) crucial characteristics, or groups of unique outlooks and attributes- and (iii) additional characteristics, which are even more restrictive and not a necessity to individuality.

ALLPORT'S PERSONALITY TRAIT THEORY: "Allport's Personality Trait Theory is still widely applied in science today."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ALLPORT'S PERSONALITY TRAIT THEORY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/allports-personality-trait-theory/ (accessed June 19, 2019).
SHARE