ANIMAL GROOMING BEHAVIOR

behavior hypothesized to serve social and hygienic functions. Self-grooming is related to mating behavior, and may involve removing dirt from fur or feathers. Allogrooming (of another), is more social in nature, and refers to animals picking through the fur of another member of the group to remove parasites and dander.

ANIMAL GROOMING BEHAVIOR: "Animal grooming behavior may relate to the self or another, and is best exemplified by monkeys, who are continually picking through the fur of other group members."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "ANIMAL GROOMING BEHAVIOR," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/animal-grooming-behavior/ (accessed December 6, 2019).
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