BASIC HOSTILITY

n. a hostile pattern which is characterized as a bad attitude. Having developed from basic anxiety, it makes the infant feel dependent on the parent figure despite a lack of affection or the threat of abuse. Out of fear, the anxiety is repressed and then expressed as neurosis and hostility towards others. First described by German-born, U.S.-based psychoanalyst Karen Horney (1885-1952).

BASIC HOSTILITY: "Contradictory as it may seem, children who have suffered from abuse manifest basic hostility directed upon others instead of towards the parent figure itself."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "BASIC HOSTILITY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/basic-hostility/ (accessed November 17, 2018).
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