BETRAYAL TRAUMA

n. the kind of trauma in which a person feels betrayed by the very people he or she trusts and depends upon. It is the foundation for a conceptual model which explains why most people lose access to memories of childhood sexual abuse. A form of repression, this response occurs when the child is still emotionally attached and dependent on this adult. First proposed by U.S. psychologist Jennifer Freydi in 1991.

BETRAYAL TRAUMA: "Betrayal trauma affects children to the core because it involves the very people they trust with their lives. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BETRAYAL TRAUMA," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/betrayal-trauma/ (accessed January 28, 2020).
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