BLANK TRIAL

n. in experimental psychology, refers to a trial integrated within an experiment. Usually, it may be used in a series of single-interval trials wherein a stimulus is presented to a subject and the answer would either be yes (meaning present) or no (meaning absent). Nonetheless, the catch is that the stimulus may actually be irregular or meaningless. See catch trial.

BLANK TRIAL: "The goal of a blank trial is to eliminate guesswork and elicit meaningful rather than automatic responses."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "BLANK TRIAL," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/blank-trial/ (accessed March 24, 2020).
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