PICK'S DISEASE

a type of dementia marked by ongoing degeneration of the temporal and frontal regions of the brain with the existence of particles referred to as Pick bodies in the cytoplasm of the neurons. The illness is marked by character modifications and deterioration of cultural abilities and complicated thinking- indicators are inclusive of dilemmas with new situations and abstractions, loss of moral judgment, trouble in thinking or focusing, disruptions of speech, loss of memory, gradual emotional dullness, and absence of spontaneity.

PICK'S DISEASE: "The problems you're presenting are very symptomatic of Pick's disease"
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "PICK'S DISEASE," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/picks-disease/ (accessed April 17, 2021).
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