REDUCTIONISM

A means of identifying a particular phenomenon by declaring that, once adequately comprehended, it can be demonstrated to be a different phenomenon, wherein the secondary phenomenon appears to be less complicated, more fundamental, or more elementary. The term is primarily utilized in positions which make an effort to have an understanding of human heritage, civilization, or mental processes with regard to animal behavior patterns or physical principles. In psychology, an accepted method is that by which psychological phenomena are reduced to biological phenomena, with the intention of proving that psychological existence is simply a product of biological functions. Compare with: emergentism. See also: identity theory, materialism, epiphenomenon.

REDUCTIONISM: "Reductionism strives to prove that psychological processes are simply a product of biological functions."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "REDUCTIONISM," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 28, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/reductionism/ (accessed October 14, 2019).
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