SELECTIVE LEARNING

Understanding how to make just one of various potential reactions or knowing about one stimulus when many stimuli are offered. A specific reaction or stimulus might have a selective benefit resulting from biological preparedness, prior knowledge, or importance in a certain circumstance. See also: blocking; overshadowing; prepared learning.

SELECTIVE LEARNING: "When an individual decides to obtain knowledge of one thing, even though another is offered, it is an example of selective learning."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "SELECTIVE LEARNING," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 28, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/selective-learning/ (accessed October 17, 2019).
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