THEORY OF MENTAL SELF-GOVERNMENT

a design of mental styles which postulates many dimensions to depict the favored manners wherein people think or display their mental skills. The dimensions are inclusive of (i) governmental; (ii) problem solving, styles labeled monarchic, hierarchic , oligarchic, and anarchic; (iii) global versus local thinking, favoring thinking about bigger, more abstract dilemmas on the one hand or concrete factors on the other; (iv) interior vs. surface thinking, corresponding to introversion-extraversion, social abilities, and cooperativeness; and (v) conservative or progressive rule-based learnings versus those which are creative and rooted in modifications.

THEORY OF MENTAL SELF-GOVERNMENT: "The theory of mental self-government was postulated by Robert J. Sternberg, an American psychologist."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "THEORY OF MENTAL SELF-GOVERNMENT," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/theory-of-mental-self-government/ (accessed March 29, 2020).
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