TRAIL MAKING TEST (TMT)

a connect-the-dot job which shapes a portion of the halstead-reitan neuropsychological battery. Trail A needs the link in a chain of 25 dots identified by numerals. Trail B needs the link in a chain of 25 dots identified by alternating numerals and letters. The test, one of the most widely utilized for mental disability, is reported to gauge many operates, especially mental flexibility, visual search sequencing, attention, and motor speed. The TMT was originally recognized as the Divided Attention Test and thereafter as Parrington's Pathways Test.

TRAIL MAKING TEST (TMT): "The TMT was cultivated first by Russell G. Eiter and John E. Parrington, both American psychologists."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "TRAIL MAKING TEST (TMT)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/trail-making-test-tmt/ (accessed August 19, 2019).
SHARE