VISUAL BLURRING

the feeling stemming from disability of the capacity to comprehend shape within the central field area, that is commonly correlated to insufficient visual acuity and lessened spatial contrast sensitivity. Visual blurring can happen as an outcome of retinal illness or injury to the optic nerve or visual cortex; it has additionally been purported as a side effect of anticholinergic drugs and as a by-product of accommodative spasm. Patients experience troubles with reading and face interpretation.

VISUAL BLURRING: "Patients with visual blurring often encounter troubles with facial recognition and reading."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "VISUAL BLURRING," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/visual-blurring/ (accessed August 24, 2019).
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