VOLLEY THEORY

the standard that separate fibers inside an auditory nerve react to one or another stimulant in a swift succession of rhythmic noise stimulants, whereas other fibers inside the nerve react to the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th stimulant. The outcome is that subsequent volleys of impulses are fired to suit the incoming data of stimulants, yet no sole fiber is needed to react to each stimulant. Thereby, a nerve can show a swifter frequency of arousal than any separate fiber could. Commonly referred to as volley standard.

VOLLEY THEORY: "In volley theory, individual fibers in an auditory nerve respond to one or another stimuli in successions. "
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "VOLLEY THEORY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 29, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/volley-theory/ (accessed November 30, 2019).
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