ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY

any number of additional interventions utilized at the same time as a main intervention to supercharge treatment efficacy. For instance, drugs might be utilized at the same time as CBT (cognitive behavior therapy), with the CBT being the main type of intervention- psychotherapy as part of a group might be utilized in addition to psychodynamic therapy on a personal level, having every intervention present it's individual views and techniques to press upon the patient's cognitive consciousness and renewal. Adjunctive treatment is usually executed by a doctor who is not the physician being used to execute the main intervention.

ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY: "Adjunctive therapy is a common approach for severe alcoholism in which CBT might be used in conjunction with the prescribing of Anabuse."
Cite this page: Nugent, Pam M.S., "ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/adjunctive-therapy/ (accessed June 28, 2017).
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