AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)

a motor neuron illness wherein both lower and upper motor neurons are impacted. It is characterized by advanced destruction of the anterior horn cells within the brainstem, cerebral cortex, and spinal cord. Signs typically arrive soon after the a person reached forty years of age and consist of muscular atrophy and fatigue, fractional and full-blown paralysis, speech handicap, and troubles swallowing or respirating. Fitfulness and magnified tendon reflexes might also be seen. Loss of life usually sets in within two to five years of the appearance of illness indicators. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is frequently put to use correspondently with motor neuron disease, in particular in the USA. Commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease.

AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS): "Amyotrophic laternal sclerosis killed Lou Gehrig in 1941, just short of his 38th birthday."
Cite this page: N., Pam M.S., "AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)," in PsychologyDictionary.org, April 7, 2013, https://psychologydictionary.org/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-als/ (accessed December 13, 2019).
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